Posts tagged artist talk
I cannot be a great mom and a great artist.

This is a major limiting believe that I have carried with me the past 10 years, or maybe lifetime.

I cannot be a brilliant and prolific artist as well as an attentive and nurturing mother.

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My career as an artist began, with motherhood. Before this, I taught art for 5 years, ran an online vintage shop, and lead creative workshops. But not until 3 years ago, while pregnant with Vigo, did I start painting for me and selling my work. Upon becoming a mother I became an ‘real’ artist.

I don’t yet know where this belief came from, I may have to seek counselling on the subject. There is a pressure for mothers in general to always be present with their children. To be there for them all the time. There is also a strong natural inclination to do so.

But as a working mama, who wants to thrive at my job and passion and in motherhood, I consistently am confronted with this self doubt about whether I am falling short in both respects.

“I cannot,'“ is just not true. Now, I have decided that I can…

What could this look like, what could being a great mom and a great artist look like? This is what I began imagining…

-I take chunks of time in the studio to perfect my craft and build a body of work. Ideally at least 3 days a week. Sharing the childcare time with my husband Dominik.

-I make beautiful work that is unique to me, that speaks to and moves people. That adds beauty to this life and (at times) bleak world.

-I make a good living as a visual artist, I could do what I love and support my family. We could be flexible and free in our lifestyle and I could be making and selling art to pay all our expenses.

-I want to be WITH my children. Enjoying and delighting in them when we spend time together.

-My children (1 child so far) are so beautiful and fun. I want to savour my time with them, especially when they are so small, cuddly and their brains are making millions of new connections a day.

-Let go of MOM GUILT and know that I am most happy when I am both working in the studio and spending time with my babies. If I were a full-time stay-at-home-mama, I would be pretty miserable. A happy, healthy, and balanced mama is of great benefit to my offspring. A miserable and overwhelmed mama who is around all the time, would not be best for their little hearts’ and brains’ maturity.


I am so grateful to share the parenting role 50/50 with my husband. This has freed me up to really take time with my son Vigo as well as put in good and consistent hours in my studio and art career. What a dream scenario.


My limiting belief is being dismounted and a few of my goals for this coming year are to…

  • Be present and active with my boys (yes we are having another boy.)

  • Take time to make, prioritise my studio practice.


Wish me luck! I’ve been practicing this the past two years, with Vigo, but I am so excited and delighted to add a new baby to our lives and see how we can make this work, while having two small children in our home and lives.

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What is a limiting belief that you believe? Imagine the possibilities if this were possible. What would it look like? It is possible.

Decide that you can.


Thanks for reading lovelies.


Anna

The Artist's Way: 5 Ways I've changed
TheArtistsWayArtistRecovery

I've been reading and working through this book called The Artist's Way by Julia Cameron. It's an artist recovery program. It's supposed to take 12 weeks. Whoops. I started it in august last year and am on "Week 11" now. It's been an incredible journey to recover my creative self. I would recommend this course/program to anyone who feels blocked as an artist. Anyone who wants to take time to make and discover/recover your artist.

One of the tasks for this week is to list 5 ways I have changed since beginning my recovery:

A painting is never finished- it simply stops in interesting places.
— Paul Gardner
  1. I have practiced making work consistently. Before the program I was making, but I hadn't been making consistently since college, 8 years ago! Yikes. This is because my day job has fallen away and I have taken the time to make. I also have been diminishing my inner perfectionist, and seeing my work as a practice, without the pressure for perfection. Calling works done when they reach an interesting point.
  2. I now call myself an artist. I have never been able to call myself an artist. I was always a creative person. I was an art teacher. I was an art major. But never an ARTIST.. Now, I can say and believe that I am an artist. It's a big step. You other artists know what I'm talking about!
  3. I have sold over 15 works. I hadn't sold any work for 8 years either and this past 7 months I have sold over 15 paintings. That's something to be proud of. It's an honor to have people start and add to their art collections with my work.
  4. I have begun nurturing my artist. In this 12 week (step) recovery program Julia Cameron encourages us to do morning pages, 3 pages of writing, and taking our artist on weekly "artist dates." Artist Dates are special times where you do something with and for your artist. Taking quality time for your artist and pampering her. Before the program and often still, I am quite cruel to my artist. Saying negative things and doubting myself. But nurturing this artist and speaking kindly to her, has really helped me to begin to flouish. (haha. so cheesy but seriously!)
  5. I have been feeling less guilt about living the life I want to live. I have major guilt about being an artist. My whole life I have had immense pressure, mostly from myself to be altruistic. I always believed that being selfless is the best and most rewarding way to live. It turns out, for me, that nurturing myself and living the life I want to live as an artist is nothing to feel guilty about, because in turn I am filled up enough to give back.

I am by no means finished with my recovery. I have however made amazing progress. I doubted I would even finish this self-help book/program. Writing my morning pages is something that I love to do and has become quite meditative. It has unblocked me in many ways. Seeing the change in me throughout The Artist's Way has kept me coming back. I have one more week to complete the course and I am proud I have made it this far, but most proud of how much I have changed.

Five ways I want to change further:

  1. prioritize making art above house chores.
  2. be open to new medium for making my work and avenues of selling and getting my stuff out there
  3. continue doing morning pages, first thing in the morning
  4. actually take my artist on frequent dates
  5. Believe that being a prolific and brilliant artist is the best thing for me, my family, freinds, and the universe.

Thanks for reading lovelies.

Anna

P.S. Thank you Julia Cameron for your inspiring guidance!

Artistic Output: #DailyBraveryPainting
I read about Meradith’s Daily Bravery Paintings and I knew I wanted to join in. She is taking the leap to show and sell her works that she is making daily. It is all about output and just taking those risks and completing something and making it available. 
Dominik and I were talking about this. We were talking about the importance of having output as an artist. Creating something somewhat quickly and putting it out into the world. And doing this will a little bit more abandon than is comfortable. Doing these quick projects gets the work out there and makes the pressure of perfection much less. 

"Your mood #1" it's 15X20cm acrylic, ink and pastel on paper. 50€ or $. Shipping included. 






So here are a few of the works from my Daily Bravery Paintings. I am still making them on the road and can ship them from the road too. So please contact me if you are interested. 

"Don't Look Away #1" it's 42 X56cm acrylic, ink and pastel on paper. 70€ or $. Shipping included.



"Your mood #3" it's 15X20cm acrylic, ink and pastel on paper. 50€ or $. Shipping included. 


"Shhhhhhh #2" it's 15X20cm acrylic, ink and pastel on paper. 50€ or $. Shipping included.



Thanks for reading lovelies. 

Anna
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Artist Excuses even on the Road
I don’t know about you other artists, but I have this artist block where I think that conditions have to be perfect in order to make art. The lack of perfect art-making conditions is one thing that honestly, often keeps me from making.
Perfect art-making conditions include: I have to be alone. I need a lot of space. I need at least 3 hours of uninterrupted time. I need every material available that I may ever use. Well, these circumstances will never all happen at once. And few of them will ever occur, letalone living the artist vanlife with a baby. 
Living on the road has been challenging this artist block. I’m barely ever alone, I usually have about a meter of space, my baby breastfeeds every 2ish hours, and I have only brought a few art supplies because space is limited. But I do have other ideal art making circumstances. I’m surrounded by inspiring things, I have a husband that shares baby time, I can take time for art, if it’s only an hour here or there. And at times it’s good to have limitations when making art. Limiting my materials can be a good challenge in art-making, it is influencing my process and artwork too. 

 Despite this silly artist block, my husband is my biggest artist advocate. He encourages me to take time to make, he loves my artwork and he loves me. I have been creating on the road and I have a number of pieces which I am making and selling from the road if you are interested, I can send a piece to you at the nearest post office on our travels.






What’s keeping you from taking time to make? What are your excuses?
Thanks for reading lovelies,

Anna

Creative habits for the Effective Artist of the 21st Century
 Dominik and I were talking about what creative habits we want to foster in the next months and so we began to compile this list.

We plan on living by these and hope they are useful and inspiring to you!


  1. Never start before you are ready.
  2. Always aim for perfection
  3. Check facebook (real quick).
  4. If you are unsure how, don’t.
  5. Let your instincts guide you. Never plan it out.
  6. Make sure all your loved one’s needs and wants are met first.
  7. Nutrition is key. Only begin after cooking an elaborate healthy meal.
  8. Now wash the dishes.
  9. If the first attempt is a failure, it’s probably not worth your time and trouble.
  10. Share your process with others. Post a selfie on instagram before you start.
  11. Check the music/art store for new materials you might want to use for your next project.
  12. Be an expert. Watch as many tutorials on the subject as you can find.
  13. Spend adequate time comparing yourself to better artists. Be very conscious of your weaknesses.
  14. If you haven’t been in the studio for over a month - you are likely not a real artist.
  15. Sold records/artwork are the true measure of quality work.
  16. MOST IMPORTANTLY: Surround yourself with people that don’t understand or care for art. This will help keep you grounded.
If you're an artist, what are some creative habits you can share with us?